Category Archives: Satanic

V/H/S/ 2 (2012) Review

 

No doubt thanks to monetary success of the Paranormal Activity franchise, the found footage genre has exploded within the last decade.  I confess: I’m not terribly versed in the subgenre, having only seen the first Paranormal and not its forefather, The Blair Witch Project.  However, the format has been used in so many other film genres (superheroes in Chronicle, monster movie in Cloverfield) that despite being a relatively new subgenre, the shaky cam footage nearly instantly loses the edge or intensity it inherently brought and instead requires the filmmakers to be creative in their use of the format.  Luckily, V/H/S/2 does this in spades. Continue reading


Curse of the Demon (1957) – Review 2

Grade: B+

First off, my apologies for the tardiness. I shall condemn myself by watching endless hours of Friday the 13th films, all the while laughing and uncontrollably being fixated upon the travesty that is the Friday franchise.  However, to the review!

I have not watched a lot of Satanic films, but so far, I’ve been intrigued with the genre, and I desperately want to see more of these types of films.  So I went in to Curse of the Demon with relatively high expectations of the film.  For a plot summation, see Warden Walker’s review of the film.  Much of what I have to add to the film he already covered (effects, mood, etc.), but I wanted to talk more about the protagonist.  And I use the term ‘protagonist’ in the most technical of terms, because to be frank, I found John to be one of the most difficult protagonist to root for in recent memory. Continue reading


Curse of the Demon (1957) – Review 1

Night of the Demon

Grade: B+

As I started to think about how I wanted to begin this review of Jacques Tourneur’s Curse of the Demon, I decided to go find the movie poster first.  And what I found is awesome.  This poster does more to make my point about this film than I could have imagined.  At first glance, the image of the demon is laughable, but stare at it for a minute.  The dark, scraggly fur, the yellow eyes, the absolutely molten lower jaw; there is still something threatening about this goofy looking monster.  Yes, the monster does appear in the film, and yes, this film does still deserve that giant banner simply stating “HORROR!”

The note at the bottom of the poster reading “Skeptical?” is really what this movie is about.  The protagonist, Dr. John Holden (Dana Andrews), is a scientist attempting to disprove and debunk claims of witchcraft, the dark arts, and the powers of Satan.  Unfortunately, when his colleague is mysteriously killed in an “accident” (mauled by a giant demon), Holden refuses to give up his investigation and is targeted by his colleague’s murderer, the nefarious Dr. Julian Karswell (Niall MacGinnis).  Stuck in his stubborn American ways, Holden dangerously shrugs off the continually mounting evidence to the existence of demons and dark magic.  When he finally begins to believe, it becomes a race against the clock to prevent his own death. Continue reading


Supernatural Season 1, Part 2

Average Grade: B

Impala, forest

The Winchesters' hunt for their father leads them into the heart of a national park.

Continuing where the pilot left off, the second episode of the series, “Wendigo,” finds Sam and Dean traveling to Colorado in search of their missing father.  Following the coordinates that he left behind, the brothers wind up in the middle of a national park.  But when they get there, they find that something in the woods has been kidnapping and killing campers for a very long time.  Upon meeting the sister of the latest disappearance, Dean is compelled to help her while an exasperated Sam complains that Dean is getting sidetracked from the hunt for their father.

What is established in the second episode–and solidified in the third episode, “Dead in the Water”–is the formula for the rest of season. Continue reading


The Black Cat (1934) – Review 2

Grade: A-

I’m not even going to substantiate this opening remark: I think this is a fantastic little horror film.

As The Man in Black mentioned, so much of the draw for this film is the squaring off of classic horror monster stars Bela Lugosi (Dracula) and Boris Karloff (Frankenstein).  But the movie is quite compelling in its own right and should not be signed off as a Hollywood stunt in the pairing of these two stars.  Continue reading


The Black Cat (1934) – Review 1

Grade: A

I originally discovered The Black Cat when I was doing research for my undergrad thesis paper.  What attracted me to the film was its two stars: Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi. Together? In the same film? Fighting each other? Sign me up! I had no idea what the film was about, in fact, I suspected the film would be rather ho-hum in comparison to my excitement at seeing Lugosi and Karloff square off.  To my ever-lasting surprise, I was delighted by how much I fell in love with the film (quirks and all) and found that The Black Cat is a vastly underrated horror film. Continue reading